ramsexalicious:

mrscriss2012:

This is my son, Chester, who is nearly 4. He was invited to his friend Chloe’s birthday party today, the theme was prince and princesses. He asked if he could go as Sleeping Beauty, so I bought him a dress and put a cute little clip in his hair.

We arrived at the party to the following comments from the adults present:
“Oh that is just cruel.”

"Why did you make him wear a dress?"

"Poor little man, what’s your mummy playing at?"

"He’s going to hate you when he grows up."

"No way I’d let my son dress like a girl."

The fact is, Chester is almost completely gender neutral. I let him wear what he wants, be it boys or girls clothes, and he plays with whatever toys he likes. This usually involves him holding tea parties while wearing his pink Minnie Mouse top, jeans and a tiara. The guests are more often than not a mixture of Winnie The Pooh characters, dinosaurs, Barbie, Dora and solders, and they’re usually transported in his favorite fire engine.

When my husband arrived at the party later on, he was subjected to endless ridicule from the other dad’s present about how I must keep his balls in my back pocket because otherwise he would have put his foot down and not allowed Chester out like that. Oh, and by the way, our other son dressed as Ariel. When my husband pointed out that the boys were happy, and the mother of the birthday child made a point of saying how wonderful she thought it was that we allowed them freedom of choice and expression, they then stopped talking about it to our faces and started muttering about us behind our backs.

Interestingly enough, not a single child said a word about their choice of costumes, other than to compliment Chester on his new dress.

not a single child made a negative comment

not a single child made a negative comment

not a single child made a negative comment

cyberbaesedgod:

valerieresin:

transient-waters:

jesusbruhh:

You can’t see it but he was in tears when he was free styling. I can relate to what every word he says and it’s just coming out straight from the heart of what he still feels.

Flow what you feel. 

I’m glad this is back on my dash

i feel you bruh, this shit real …

neil-gaiman:

audreybenjaminsen:

I read Neil Gaiman’s “Ocean at the End of the Lane” this summer, and It completely got me back into reading. 

This is my interpretation of one of the “Hunger Birds,” the willfully aggressiveworld devouring varmints. When something is out of hand, or out of place, they devour.

They are the Cleaners. 

The image of them was so clear to me, that I couldn’t help but try to put it on paper. 

I also read that Focus Features will be adapting this story into a film that will be produced by Tom hanks and directed by Joe Wright. I would very much love to be a part of that. 

 

This is so beautiful, and so much like the Hunger Birds inside of my head.

Me.

Me.

blu3chan:

Bettina Rheims, serie Gender Studies for Candy magazine, 2012.

When I look at anybody I try to look at them neutrally… It didn’t take long for me to start seeing humans in an entirely different way… They don’t even look the same as they did before.

We must disincentivize homelessness by making it less pleasurable to people, that is why putting spikes up to prevent sleeping in public spaces is a much needed innovation of economics progress.
Sophomore Economics Major (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

onlinecounsellingcollege:

Depersonalization Disorder is where a person “looks at themselves from the outside”, and observes their own physical actions or mental processes as if they were an observer instead of themselves. This often brings a sense of unreality, and an alteration in the…